Ballot Status History: Chronology

1990

November 1990: The Green Party of Alaska qualified for statewide ballot status in November 1990. Jim Sykes ran for Governor and received 3.3%and 6,563 votes. The 3.3% supassed the 3% required to qualify the Green Party of Alaska for the ballot, the first U.S. state in which the Green Party achieved ballot status.

1992

January 1992: The Green Party of California qualified for statewide ballot status in January 1992.As of December 31st, 1991, the Green Party of California had 100,897 Green voter registrants, surpassing the 78,992 needed for statewide ballot status.

May 1992: The Hawai’i’i Green Party qualified for statewide ballot status in May 1992. In May 1992, the Hawai’i Green Party submitted over 8,000 signatures of petition signers, surpassing the 4,533 signature threshold needed to qualify as a statewide ballot status party.

June 1992: The Arizona Green Party qualified for statewide ballot status in June, 1992. The Arizona Green Party gathered a sufficient number of petition signatures to qualify for statewide ballot status.

November 1992: Hawai’i’i Green Party retained its statewide ballot status in November 1992. Linda Martin received 13.7% and 49,921 votes for U.S. Senate. This 13.7% surpassed the 10% needed for the Hawai’i Green Party to retain its ballot status through the 1994 elections.

1994

November 1994: The Green Party of Alaska retained statewide ballot status in November 1994. Jim Sykes received 3.9% and 7,221 votes for Governor. The 3.9% surpassed the 3% required for the Green Party of Alaska to retain its statewide ballot status.

November 1994: The Arizona Green Party failed to retain statewide ballot status in 1994. To retain ballot status, a party must have at least 14,500 voters as registered party members. The AZGP failed to reach that threshold and fell off the ballot.

November 1994: The Green Party of California retained statewide ballot status in November 1994. Margaret Garcia received 3.8% and 315,079 votes for Secretary of State, surpassing the 2% threshold necessary to retain statewide ballot status.

November 1994: The Green Party of Colorado did not qualify for statewide ballot status in November 1994. But it did qualify for Qualified Political Organization status. Phil Hufford received 1.5% and 16,908 votes for Governor. The 1.5% was not sufficient to reach the 10% required for Governor to achieve statewide ballot status. However, the Green Party of Colorado did receive “Qualified Political Organization” status. This was achieved by qualifying the Hufford gubernatorial campaign under rules for independent candidates, which included submitting the required 1,000 valid petition signers for Hufford’s candidacy (over 2,200 were gathered), and fulfilling various administrative requirements. By qualifying for Qualified Political Organization status, it also became possible to register as a Green in Colorado.

November 1994: The Green Party of New Mexico qualified for statewide ballot status in November 1994. Roberto Mondragon ran for Governor and received 10.4% and 47,080 votes, running together with Lt. Governor candidate Steven Schmidt. Lorenzo Garcia received 32.7% and 125,370 votes for State Treasurer; and Patricia Wolff received 11.7% and 53.066 votes for Public Lands Commissioner. All of these totals surpassed the 5% necessary for the New Mexico Green Party to qualify for statewide ballot status.

November 1994: The Maine Green Party qualifed for statewide ballot status in November, 1994. Jonathan Carter received 6.4% and 32,695 votes for Governor. The 6.4% surpassed the 5% required to qualify the Maine Green Party for the ballot.

1996

May 1996: The Green Party of Nevada qualified for statewide ballot status in May 1996. In May 1996, the Green Party of Nevada submitted more than the 3,761 valid petition signatures to qualify for statewide ballot status.

May 1996: The Hawai’i Green Party retained its statewide ballot status in May 1996. In May 1996, the Hawai’i Green Party submitted over 7,500 signatures of petition signers, surpassing the 4,888 signature threshold needed to retain its statewide ballot status.

November 1996: The Green Party of New Mexico retained statewide ballot status in November 1996. Peggy Helgeson received 11% and 56,127 votes for Corporation Commissioner; Tom Luebben received 5.0% and 25,275 votes for State Supreme Court. Both totals surpassed the 5% necessary for the New Mexico Green Party to retain its statewide ballot status.

November 1996: The Green Party of Nevada retained statewide ballot status in November 1996. In November 1996, Ralph Nader received 4,730 votes and 1.0% for president. These 4,730 votes were more than the 4,498 votes needed to retain minor party status and statewide ballot access.

November 1996: The Hawai’i’i Green Party failed to retain ballot status in November 1996. Ralph Nader received 2.9% and 10,386 votes for president. His 2.9% was not sufficient to surpass the 10% needed for the Hawai’i Green Party to retain its ballot status.

November 1996: The Maine Green Party failed to retain statewide ballot status in November 1996. Ralph Nader received 2.5% for president. This 2.5% was not sufficient to surpass the 5% threshold necessary for the Maine Green Party to retain ballot status.

November 1996: The Green Party of Rhode Island failed to qualify for statewide ballot status in November 1996. Ralph Nader received 1.55% for president. His 1.55% did not reach the 5% required for the Green Party of Rhode Island to retain its statewide ballot status.

November 1996: The Green Party of Minnesota failed to qualify for statewide ballot status in November 1996. Ralph Nader received 1.1% and 24,908 votes in November 1996 for president. This 1.1% failed to reach the 5% needed to qualify the Green Party of Minnesota for statewide ballot status.

1997

November 1997: The Hawai’i’i Green Party regained its statewide ballot status. In 1997, the Hawai’i’i legislature passed a Green-sponsored to change the wording of a state law and this law was applied retroactively to the Green Party, allowing for its 1994 results to allow the Hawai’i Green Party to remain on the ballot through 2006.

1998

July 1998: The Green Party of Colorado qualified for statewide ballot status in July 1998. In 1998, the Colorado state legislature changed the criteria for the statewide ballot status. The 10% for governor requirement still remained in order to attain ‘major party’ status. But a new ‘minor party’ status category was also created. To become a minor party, a party would need at least 1,000 registered voters as members or gather 10,000 petition signers on behalf of the party. The Green Party of Colorado qualified via the voter registration method. At the time of the law’s passing, April 13th, 1998, the Green Party of Colorado had 936 registrants. By June 30th – the law’s effective date – Colorado Green registration had grown to 1,226.

November 1998: The Green Party of Alaska retained statewide ballot status in November 1998. Desa Jacobson received 3.0% and 6,608 votes for Governor. The 3.0% reached the 3% required for the Green Party of Alaska to retain its statewide ballot status – but just barely – Jacobson passed the 3% threshold by 12 votes.

November 1998: The Green Party of California retained statewide ballot status in November 1998. In November 1998, the Green Party had 98,443 registered members, more than the 89,007 needed at that point to retain statewide ballot status. Sara Amir received 3.1% and 247,702 votes for Lt. Governor, also surpassing the 2% threshold necessary to retain statewide ballot status.

November 1998: The Green Party of New Mexico retained statewide ballot status in November 1998. Richard E. Haley, Jr. received 29% and 116,333 votes for State Auditor; Sam Hitt received 16% and 66,684 votes for Public Lands Commissioner; and Damacio A. Lopez received 6% and 28,480 votes for Secretary of State. All three totals surpassed the 5% necessary for the New Mexico Green Party to retain its statewide ballot status.

November 1998: The D.C. Green Party qualified for ballot status in November 1998. Mike Livingston received 9,479 votes and 8.4% for U.S. House of Representatives ‘Shadow’ (i.e. non-voting) Representative. Livingston’s 9,479 votes surpassed the 7,500 required to qualify the D.C. Green Party for the ballot.

November 1998: The Maine Green Independent Party qualifed for statewide ballot status in November 1998. Pat LaMarche received 6.8% and 28,722 votes for Governor. The 6.8% surpassed the 5% required to qualify the Maine Green Indepedent Party for the ballot.

November 1998: The Green Party of New York State qualified for statewide ballot status in November 1998. Al Lewis received 52,533 votes for governor in November 1998. These 52,533 votes were sufficient to surpass the 50,000 votes for governor necessary to qualify the Green Party of New York State for statewide ballot status.

November 1998: The Wisconsin Green Party qualified for statewide ballot status in November 1998. Jeff Peterson received 1.9% and 31,329 votes for Secretary of State. His 1.9% surpassed the 1% needed for the Wisconsin Green Party to qualify for statewide ballot status for four years.

November 1998: The Green Party of Nevada failed to retain statewide ballot status in November 1998. The Green Party of Nevada did not run any candidates in 1998, nor did it petition to retain its ballot status. Therefore by doing nothing to retain its ballot status, it lost it.

November 1998: The Green Party of Minnesota failed to qualify for statewide ballot status in November 1996. Ken Pentel received 0.3% and 6,983 votes in November 1998 for governor. This 0.3% failed to reach the 5% needed to qualify the Green Party of Minnesota for statewide ballot status.

1999

February 1999: The Green Party of Florida qualified for ballot status in March 1999. In 1998, Florida changed the criteria for statewide ballot status, to allow for any party organized on a statewide basis to qualify for the ballot. The Green Party of Florida was organized as a state party in 1992. Once the state law was changed, the state legislature passed implenting language in February 1999 that allowed the Green Party of Florida to be recognized as a state party and to therefore qualify for the ballot .

November 1999: In October 1999, the D.C. Green Party merged with the D.C. Statehood Party, becoming the D.C. Statehood Green Party. Registered members of the D.C. Statehood Party automatically became members of the D.C. Statehood Green Party. The D.C. Green Party officially dissolved as part of this process, as part of a resolution filed by the D.C. Green Party and approved by the D.C. Board of Elections and Ethics on November 3rd, 1999.

2000

March 2000: The Green Party of Delaware qualified for statewide ballot status in March 2000. The Green Party of Delaware had 435 Green registrants by the March 2000 deadline for the November 2000 elections, surpassing the 235 registrants needed to qualify for statewide ballot status.

May 2000: The Green Party of Texas qualified for statewide ballot status in May 2000. The Green Party of Texas gathered over 72,000 petition signatures, enough to surpass the 37,381 needed to qualify for statewide ballot status as of May 2000.

June 2000: The Arizona Green Party qualified for statewide ballot status in summer, 1998. The criteria for qualification in Arizona was (and still is) to achieve a certain number of petition signatures. The Arizona Green Party gathered a sufficient number of signatures.

August 2000: The Maryland Green Party qualified as a recognized political party in August 2000, and qualified for statewide ballot status for the 2000 presidential election only. In August 2000, the Maryland Green Party was recognized as a political party by the State Board of Elections. This status made it possible to register as a Green in Maryland and qualified the party through 2002.

August 2000: The Green Party of Pennsylvania qualified for statewide ballot status by petition in August 2000, for the November 2000 elections.

November 2000: The D.C. Statehood Green Party retained ballot status in November 2000. Ralph Nader received 10,576 votes for president. His 10,576 votes surpassed the 7,500 required for the D.C. Statehood Green Party to retain its ballot status.

November 2000: The Maine Green Independent Party retained statewide ballot status in November 2000. Ralph Nader received 5.7% and 37,127 votes for president. The 5.7% surpassed the 5% required for the Maine Green Party to retain ballot status. Even though Maine Greens already had ballot status through 2002, the 5.7% extended their status out to 2004.

November 2000: The Green Party of Nevada retained statewide ballot status in November 2000. In November 2000, Ralph Nader received 15,008 votes and 5.4% for president. These 15,008 votes were more than the 5,000 votes needed to retain minor party status and statewide ballot access.

November 2000: The Green Party of Texas retained statewide ballot status in November 2000. Three candidates passed the 5% needed for the Green Party of Texas to retain its statewide ballot status: Ben Levy received 9.7% and 450,885 votes for Texas Supreme Court; Gary Dugger received 7.3% and 344,806 votes for Texas Railroad Commission; and Charles Mauch received 7.2% and 336,781 votes for Texas Railroad Commission.

November 2000: The Wisconsin Green Party retained statewide ballot status in November 2000. Ralph Nader received 3.4% and 94.070 votes. His 3.4% surpassed the 1% needed for the Wisconsin Green Party to retain for statewide ballot status for four years.

November 2000: The Green Party of Minnesota qualified for statewide ballot status in November 2000. Ralph Nader received 5.2% and 126,696 votes in November 2000 for president. His 5.2% surpassed the 5% needed to qualify the Green Party of Minnesota for statewide ballot status, and qualified it through the 2004 elections.

November 2000: The Green Party of Pennsylvania qualified for statewide ballot status as a minor political party, by virtue of votes cast for Ralph Nader and Winona LaDuke, Barbara Knox, Anne Goeke and Tom Linzey in November 2000. By qualifying for minor party status, it also became possible to register as a Green in Pennsylvania.

November 2000: The Green Party of Rhode Island qualified for statewide ballot status in November 2000. Ralph Nader received 6.2% and 25,052 votes for president in 2000. His 6.2% supassed the 5% required to qualify the Green Party of Rhode Island for the ballot.

November 2000: The Green Party of New Mexico failed to maintain its statewide ballot status in November 2000. After the 2000 elections, the New Mexico Secretary of State reinterpreted New Mexico’s statewide ballot access law, ruling that the 5% threshold in a statewide race could be achieved only in the governors or presidential race. Marvin Gladstone received 54,926 votes for the state Circuit Court of Appeals – equal to 10% of the presidential vote in NM. This total was not ruled to count towards the New Mexico Green ballot requalification effort. Ralph Nader received 3.5% for president. His 3.5% was insufficient to reach the 5% necessary for the New Mexico Green Party to retain ballot status.

2001

February 2001: The Iowa Green Party qualified for statewide ballot status in February 2001. In November 2000, Ralph Nader received 2.3% and 29,352 votes in for president. His 2.3% surpassed the 2% needed to qualifty the Iowa Green Party for statewide ballot status. The ballot status officially went into effect in February 2001.

2002

April 2002: The Green Party of Mississippi qualified for statewide ballot status in April 2002. The Green Party of Mississippi became an official party and achieved statewide ballot status when its registration as a statewide party was accepted by the Secretary of State’s Office on April 4, 2002.

August 2002: The Green Party of Pennsylvania re-qualified for statewide ballot status by petition in August 2002, for the November 2002 elections.

November 2002: The Green Party of California retained statewide ballot status in 2002. As of November 2002, the Green Party had 155,952 registered members, more than the 77,389 needed at that point to retain statewide ballot status. Seven candidates also received more the 2% necessary for the Green Party of California to retain statewide ballot status: Peter Miguel Camejo received 5.3% and 393,036 votes for Governor; Donna Warren received 307,254 votes and 4.2% for Lt. Governor; Larry Shoup received 282,340 votes and 3.9% for Secretary of State; Jeanne Marie Rosenmeier received 356,077 votes and 4.9% for Treasurer, Laura Wells received 419,873 votes and 5.8% for Controller; David Ishmael Sheidlower received 277,667 votes and 3.9% for Insurance Commissioner and Glen Mower received 3.9% for Attorney General.

November 2002: The D.C. Statehood Green Party retained ballot status in November 2002. Debby Hanrahan received 13,581 votes and 10.9% for City Council, Council Chair and Michele Tingling-Clemmons received 13,828 votes and 7.2% for City Council, at-large member. Both vote totals surpassed the 7,500 required for the Statehood Green Party to retain its ballot status.

November 2002: The Maine Green Independent Party retained and extended statewide ballot status in November 2002. Jonathan Carter received 9.3% and 46,179 votes for Governor. The 9.3% surpassed the 5% required for the Maine Green Party to retain ballot status. Even though Maine Greens already had ballot status through 2004, the 9.3% extended their status out to 2006.

November 2002: The Green Party of New Mexico retained its statewide ballot status in November 2002. David Bacon received 5.5% and 26,465 votes for Governor, runing together with Lt. Governor candidate Kathy Sanchez. Their total surpassed the 5% necessary for the New Mexico Green Party to regain its statewide ballot status.

November 2002: The Green Party of Pennsylvania re-qualified for statewide ballot status as a minor political party, by virtue of votes cast for Michael Morrill and Vicki Smedley for Governor and Lt. Governor in November 2002.

November 2002: The Wisconsin Green Party retained statewide ballot status in November 2002. Jim Young received 44,111 votes and 2.5% and 44,111 votes for Governor and Paul Aschenbrenner received 6.92% and 114,955 votes for Treasurer. Both totals surpassed the 1% needed for the Wisconsin Green Party to retain its statewide ballot status for four years.

November 2002: The Iowa Green Party failed to retain its statewide ballot status in November 2002. Jay Robinson received 1.4% and 14,628 votes for Governor. His 1.4% was not sufficient to reach the 2% necessary for the Iowa Green Party to retain statewide ballot status.

November 2002: The Green Party of Minnesota failed to retain in November 2002. Ken Pentel received 2.3% and 50,589 votes for governor. This 2.3% was not sufficient to extend the Green Party of Minnesota’s ballot status past 2004.

November 2002: The Green Party of New York State failed to retain statewide ballot status in November 2002. Stanley Aronowitz received 41,797 votes for governor in November 2002. These 41,797 were not sufficient to re-qualify the Green Party of New York State for statewide ballot status.

November 2002: The Green Party of Texas failed to retain its statewide ballot status in November 2002. Eleven candidates received between 0.6% and 1.8%, all below the 5% threshold necessary for the Green Party of Texas to retain its statewide ballot status.

2003

November 2003: The Green Party of Alaska regained its statewide ballot status on November 3rd, 2003 when a Alaska Superior Court ordered the State of Alaska to put the Green Party back on the ballot. The party filed a lawsuit in Anchorage Superior Court on July 29, 2003, against the state law that requiring a party to receive at least 3% of the vote in every gubernatorial race to maintain ballot status. The party aruged that results from any statewide race in Alaska should be used to reach this threshold. In the 2002 General Election, Jim Sykes received 7.24% of the votes for U.S. Senator and Russell DeForest received 6.34% for U.S. House of Representatives.

2004

August 2004: The Green Party of Pennsylvania re-qualified for statewide ballot status by petition in August 2004, for the November 2004 elections, with 30,023 valid signatures.

November 2004: The D.C. Statehood Green Party retained ballot status in November 2004. Laurent Ross received 23,322 and 4.5% for at-large member on the City Council. His 23,322 votes surpassed the 7,500 required for the D.C. Statehood Green Party to retain its ballot status.

November 2004: The Green Party of Pennsylvania retained statewide ballot status as a minor political party, by virtue of votes cast for Marakay Rogers for Attorney General.

November 2004: The Green Party of Minnesota failed to retain statewide ballot status in November 2004. David Cobb received 0.16% and 4,408 votes in November 2004 for present. This 0.16% failed to reach the 5% required for the Green Party of Minnesota to retain its statewide ballot status.

November 2004: The Green Party of Rhode Island failed to retain statewide ballot status in November 2004. David Cobb received 0.30% and 1,333 votes for president in 2004. His 0.30% did not reach the 5% required for the Green Party of Rhode Island to remain on the ballot.